Cooperation Winston Salem helps with the Happy Hill Community Garden


A new group from the Piedmont Triad, Cooperation Winston Salem, which is dedicated to nurturing the community, has launched a local effort to encourage healthy lifestyles. A new urban farm in the Happy Hill neighborhood is the first of many community gardens slated to be established in the city, organizers say. “The more people in our city are getting their hands on the ground,” said Eric Mathis, one of the group’s organizers. “We are building our collective immune system through Winston-Salem. Mathis said a healthy lifestyle begins in gardens, like the one in Happy Hill, one of Winston-Salem’s oldest African-American neighborhoods. Some local urban farmers involved in the project said fruits and vegetables were grown in the garden, including watermelons and squash. The collaboration between urban farmers and neighbors of Happy Hill has taken the community garden to the next level. Mathis said the Happy Hill Community Garden has already been around for almost two years and said the new collaboration has led to recent improvements. Now the new group wants to plant seeds for years to come. “I hope he can feed the community. Also, able to teach the community for education. So they know where the food comes from, ”said Sherard Ozaka. For Sherard Ozaka, he said there are lessons learned in the garden, both for the present and the future. “I learned that you have to keep working hard. It’s an everyday battle, but you know you have to work hard and even though it sometimes feels like you are alone you just have to push, ”said Ozaka. Leaders of the Winston-Salem Cooperation said the goal was to provide healthier and fresher options to low-income neighborhoods and said several restaurants in the area are involved in the restaurant-supported agriculture program. of the group.

A new group from the Piedmont Triad, Cooperation Winston Salem, which is dedicated to nurturing the community, has launched a local effort to encourage healthy lifestyles.

A new urban farm in the Happy Hill neighborhood is the first of many community gardens slated to be established in the city, organizers say.

“The more people in our city are getting their hands on the land,” said Eric Mathis, one of the group’s organizers. “We are strengthening our collective immune system through Winston-Salem.”

Mathis said a healthy lifestyle begins in gardens, like the one in Happy Hill, one of Winston-Salem’s oldest African-American neighborhoods.

Some local urban farmers involved in the project said fruits and vegetables were grown in the garden, including watermelons and squash.

The collaboration between urban farmers and neighbors of Happy Hill has taken the community garden to the next level.

Mathis said the Happy Hill Community Garden has already been around for almost two years and said the new collaboration has led to recent improvements. Now the new group wants to plant seeds for years to come.

“I hope he can feed the community. Also, able to teach the community for education. So they know where the food comes from, ”said Sherard Ozaka.

For Sherard Ozaka, he said there are lessons learned in the garden, both for the present and the future.

“I learned that you have to keep working hard. It’s an everyday battle, but you know you have to work hard and even though it sometimes feels like you are alone you just have to push, ”said Ozaka.

Leaders of the Winston-Salem Cooperation said the goal was to provide healthier and fresher options to low-income neighborhoods and said several restaurants in the area are involved in the restaurant-supported agriculture program. of the group.

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